Finding—and keeping—top talent

According to our survey, the need for employees with technology skills in areas like analytics, cloud, and programming will increase over the next three years. What does it take to attract top talent that meets companies’ increasingly tech-based needs?

A recent article from CIO magazine talks about some of the ways tech firms are trying to recruit elite developers. The top tactic? Money—and at many companies (mostly those based in New York and Silicon Valley), a lot of it.

What will happen if compensation turns out to be only a temporary fix for retaining talent? How important is personal satisfaction with work when the excitement over creative perks and compensation wanes?

Our survey looks at these issues and more—we’ll have answers about the benefits that matter most to employees, along with data on what companies are actually offering, in the next few weeks.

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2020 Workforce news roundup

Working Anything but 9 to 5 (The New York Times): For hourly employees, the uncertainty of the next week’s schedule can create chaos at home—especially for those with families.

7 Ways to Become Your Boss’ Dream Employee (Time): A relationship with a manager can be the key to success at work—and cultivating a good one starts with working to make your boss successful.

5 Simple Office Policies That Make Danish Workers Way More Happy Than Americans (FastCompany): Danish employees may be more likely to be satisfied and engaged with their jobs because of better working hours, more autonomy, and constant training, among other factors.

Would You Hire Your Hacker? (Wired): After a college student hacked into a popular messaging app, the co-founder of the company hired him on a freelance basis, recognizing that a good hacker has security expertise. Companies should consider creative hiring methods like this one—but be wary of potential consequences.

Recruitment policies hurting business in Hong Kong?

Business increasingly relies on globally aware and culturally sensitive leaders with a broad understanding of the business and markets in which they operate.

In a strongly worded opinion article from the South China Morning Post, financial writer and former banker Peter Guy argues that policymakers in Hong Kong are too Hong Kong-centric, resulting in a narrow approach to decision-making and recruitment that has led to stagnation in the city’s businesses and government.

The tone and importance of recruitment is set by leadership, the board or the owner. Cultivating talent starts at the top.

To achieve competitive advantage, Guy writes, Hong Kong must “push the boundaries of talent” to drive innovation in business, education, and government.